Four “Put Me in the Zoo” Learning Activities that Enhance Cognitive and Language Development

 Four “Put Me in the Zoo” Learning Activities that Enhance Cognitive and Language Development

As my son is growing older, I am creating educational activities based around his interests. Put Me in the Zoo has been one of his favorite books for some time now; so I created four activities based around the creature that is featured in this book with the purpose of teaching him:

1. to recognize the colors red, blue, orange, green and purple

2. the word of each color

Materials:

Preparation:

In the book, the creature is depicted standing in many different positions; I chose the stance below because it was the easiest for me to sketch out and copy. I used nine pieces of yellow construction paper to create the creature. I cut out, arranged, and taped each piece on the wall. Then I taped the contact paper over it.


The creatures spots changes colors in the book, so I traced the top of a mug to create circles on red, blue, green, purple and orange construction paper. I also traced a separate batch of circles in each color and wrote out the word of each color within the circles. I cut the circles out and laminated them. As a teacher, I have found that laminated material has a much longer life span than those that are not; and it works especially well with contact paper. Laminated material can easily be placed and removed from contact paper without damaging any of the material.

I also created word cards for each color. I wrote out the name of each color using a crayon in the appropriate color. Next to the word, I traced an outline of a circle in the same color.


 These word cards can be differentiated by:

1. eliminating the outline of the circle all together

2. shading in the rest of the circle with the appropriate color

3. tracing an outline of a circle in the appropriate color (as depicted above)

4. writing the word of the color within the outline

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Activity 1: Matching Color to Color

Pictured below is the completed activity:

Ask the child to point to or say the color of the spots depicted on the creature on the specific page in the book. Then, ask him to pick the appropriate color circle (as seen on the creature on the specific page in the book) and match it to the spots already placed on the creature. Do this every time the creature’s spots change in the book.

Activity 2: Matching Color to Word

Pictured below is the completed activity:

Ask the child to point to or say the color of the spots depicted on the creature on the specific page in the book. Then ask him to pick the appropriate color circle (as seen on the creature on the specific page in the book) and match it to the word that represents the color. Do this every time the creature’s spots change in the book.

Activity 3: Matching Word to Color

Ask the child to point to or say the color of the spots depicted on the creature on the specific page in the book. Then ask him to pick the word that represents the color (as seen on the creature on the specific page in the book) and match it to the appropriate color. Do this every time the creature’s spots change in the book.

Activity 4: Color Selection

Ask the child to point to or say the color of the spots depicted on the creature on the specific page in the book. Then ask child to pick the appropriate color from a selection of two or three colors before putting them on the creature. Do this every time the creature’s spots change in the book.

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I hope you enjoyed reading about the four super fun Put Me in the Zoo learning activities that I created for my son. Please comment and let me know if you tried any of these activities and how it turned out! I hope you have a wonderful day!

Teaching Paul the Foundational Skills Required for Literacy Achievement: Part One

Teaching Paul the Foundational Skills Required for Literacy Achievement: Part One

Good afternoon and happy Wednesday! When Paul turned 8 months old, he finally reached an age where he loved to read books. As an early childhood educator and a post-graduate student studying literacy, I want to ensure that I provide Paul with an early childhood education that will ensure that he obtains literacy achievement. These are the elements that I am currently teaching to foster his literacy achievement.

  1. Teaching Concepts About Print.
    • Every time I read to Paul, I:
      • show him how to hold the book properly.
      • I tell him that we are looking at the front cover of the book.
      • I point to the title and read it to him while ensuring that he is following along with my finger as I point to each word. This teaches him that I am reading words; and it teaches him that we read print from left to right.
      • I tell him who the author is, and what the author does. Then I show him the words on the front cover as well as throughout the book.
      • I tell him who the illustrator is and what an illustrator does; and then I point to the pictures on the front cover and throughout the book. I explain that the pictures always depict an illustration that matches the text.
      • As we read the book, I point to all the words as I read them and talk about the illustrations on the page.
      • I always ask Paul to turn the page, and when we reach the back cover; we talk about it and I explain that we have reached the end of the book.
  2. Teaching Letter and Sound Knowledge.
    • I am currently teaching Paul about the alphabet by helping him to identify letters; their shapes; and their sounds. We are currently working on the letter P.
  3. Teaching Vocabulary.
    • When Matt and I speak to Paul, we speak to him in full sentences and use simple and complex language. The more language he is exposed to, the more language he will acquire. The more he hears language being spoken to him and, later, the more he practices language; the better his understanding of semantics, syntax, and phonology will become.
  4. Teaching that there is a purpose for learning to read and write.
    • Paul sees Matt and I reading and writing. We always explain why we are reading; why we are writing; and why it is important to read and write.

There are many elements of literacy that need to be understood before acquiring literacy achievement. By showing Paul that we value language, reading and writing; that there is a purpose for learning how to read and write; and by teaching him the above skills from an early age; we are ensuring the he is learning the foundational skills required for literacy achievement.

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Thank you for reading! I hope that you have a happy Wednesday! =D

Access for All Students- Literacy: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

Good morning everyone! Today’s upload is a reading of “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault  I hope you that you enjoy it!

Hello There =D

Good evening and happy Saturday! On this blog, I will be recording videos of me reading children’s books which will be uploaded each week with the hopes of providing literacy access to all children. I will also post audios of me reading to my class to demonstrate fun ways to incorporate student involvement while reading books. I am so excited to share these videos and audios with you!

Multimodal Teaching — A Reading to My Class: “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”

Good afternoon and happy Saturday! I am so excited to share an audio demonstrating my students engagement with the book “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed.” This book not only strengthens literacy development, but also the development of understanding mathematical concepts. This is a classroom favorite, I hope that you enjoy =D

Multimodal Teaching — A Reading to My Class: “Go Dog Go”

Good evening and happy Saturday! I am super excited to share an audio of me reading “Go Dog Go” by P.D. Eastman to my wonderful students. This audio demonstrates how the use of multimodal teaching completely engages the students in the story. I hope that you enjoy =D